All posts in Haunted Churches

Borley Rectory. Essex

The strange unexplained phenomenon at Borley rectory during the 1920s and 1930s

The strange unexplained phenomenon at Borley rectory during the 1920s and 1930’s are probably among the most famous in England.

Built for the Reverend H.D.E Bull 1863, Borley was constructed on the site of a Benedictine Monastery. Both the Reverend Bull and his son Harry passed away in Borley’s ‘Blue room’ which was reported to be the most haunted spot in the house. Famously Harry Price leased the Rectory for a year so he could conduct his investigations with a team of researchers.

The results of his detailed and lengthy investigation were published in ‘The Most Haunted House in England’. In 1885, there were sightings of a ghostly nun at the rectory. She was believed to be the ghost of a 13th century Nun from a nearby convent who fell in forbidden love with a monk from the local monastery.

They paid a high price for their affair – the monk was hanged, and the Nun walled up inside the convent. In 1900, two sisters of the then owner Harry Bull, reportedly saw the Nun one day in the gardens. She has also appeared to many local people. A phantom coach and horses has also been seen in the vicinity of the Rectory. Mysterious footsteps, doorbells ringing have also been heard by visitors.

Poltergeist phenomena have also been experienced and recorded at the haunted building. Smashed glasses and stone throwing, mysterious writing on the walls and people being thrown from their beds by an unearthly force have all been reported. In 1939 Borley was destroyed by a fire and the ruin was finally demolished completely in 1944.

70 plus years on and Borley Rectory in Essex is once again hitting the public imagination,  specifically Ashley Thorpe’s who will be realeasing in 2012, his film The true story of ‘Borley Rectory – The Most Haunted House in England’. based upon the incidents and recorded expereinces of the renowed psychic investigator Harry Price.

Borley Rectory Teaser Trailer from Ashley Thorpe on Vimeo.

Fleece Inn. Bretforton

The ghost of Lola Taplin, a former landlady of the Fleece Inn

Bretforton village has several local legends of ghosts, ghouls and murder…

Bretforton village has changed little over the centuries: the earliest documented record of the villge name dates back to 709AD.  The settlement is distinguished historically by an unusual system of land ownership.

Some of the more notable ghosts within the village and surrounding areas includes the ghost of Lola Taplin, a former landlady of the Fleece Inn. It is is said that Lola Taplin haunts the bar area of the inn, throwing food, glasses and other objects at both the staff and visitors alike.

The haunting of Spot Loggins Well is also well known in the locals of Bretforton, its is reported that this water well has been in use for over four hundred years and is named after a cattle driver called Spot Loggins who drowned in a cattle spring in the 17th century.

Local legend states that any who runs around the well three times while blindfolded will lose anything they are carrying.The Water Well is located on the old Bretforton House Farm of the Appleby family and the Spot Loggin ghost is celebrated locally in November at the local Fleece Inn.

The Church at Bretforton also plays a large part in ghostly happenings and the supernatural at Bretforton, there have been several reports over the years of a phantom funeral procession arriving at the church, and disappearing into the ether as quickly as it appears, for whom it represents is a mystery even till this day.

The fields on either side of the church are said to be haunted by a decapitated woman, carrying her head under arm. It is suggested the decapitated woman is the ghost of Ann Cormell, who was murdered on 4th February 1707 by John Allen of Bretforton, Giles Hunt, Tom Dun, Thomas Palmer and Thomas Symonds.

John Allen was later hung in a gibbet in Bretforton at what is now known as “Allen’s Barn”

Gill House Bromfield, Aspatria. Cumbria

Gill house - Photo Provided by Laurie Kemp

During World War II Gill House was used as a dormitory for the Woman’s Land Army, since then its laid claim to being one of the most haunted houses in Cumbria.
Photo Provided by Laurie Kemp

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St. Nicholas Churchyard. Birmingham

Witnessed back in 1977, was a ghostly figure of a woman in the graveyard in Cardworth.

Witnessed back in 1977, was a ghostly figure of a woman in the graveyard in Cardworth.

Described as a tall ghostly figure in a long flowing green gown, she is believed to be the spirit of a woman buried in a mass grave after a battle during the Civil War.

Pluckley Church Yard. Kent

The ghost of a ‘Red Lady’ haunts this churchyard.

The ghost of a ‘Red Lady’ haunts this churchyard.

She wonders the graves sorrowfully seeking her un-christened baby. The ghost is believed to be the spirit of the wife of one of the Derings, lords of the manor of Pluckle. The woman had a child, which for one reason or another died, and was buried hastily, in an unmarked grave. The ghostly form of the Red Lady wanders the churchyard at night, sobbing bitterly, and searching for the grave of her unacknowledged child.