The Flying Dutchman.

The most famous of ghost ships The Flying Dutchman, which hit rocks and sunk during a heavy storm in 1641.

The most famous of ghost ships The Flying Dutchman, which hit rocks and sunk during a heavy storm in 1641.

The phantom ship of legend appears during stormy weather off the Cape of Good Hope, at Africa’s southern tip.  It is feared by mariners as an omen of disaster, and they say that if you look at the ship you will die a horrible death.

When the Dutch ship was sinking the Captain of the vessel, van der Decken (who knew his death was looming) shouted out “I WILL round this Cape even if I have to keep sailing until doomsday!“. The ghost ship has been reported many times, even by the crew of a German submarine boat during World War II.

On 11 July 1881, the Royal Navy ship, the Bacchante sighted the phantom. The midshipman, a prince who later became King George V, recorded that the lookout and the officer of the watch had seen the Flying Dutchman.

“A strange red light as of a phantom ship all aglow, in the midst of which light the mast, spars and sails of a brig 200 yards distant stood out in strong relief.”

It was reported that the lookout fell from a mast and died, shortly after seeing the phantom ship.

Loves a good ghost story, especially whilst sat in front of an open log fire on a cold and dark winters night.

One Comment on "The Flying Dutchman."

  1. mariah smith says:

    i dont care you say there might have been a ship that was named that but theres no such things as ghost

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