All posts tagged Battlefield

Newhaven Fort. East Sussex

New Haven Fort Naval gun Firing

The year 1066 saw the last successful invasion of Britain, since then our coasts have been guarded by a succession of forts and castles strategically located all around the country.

Seaford Bay and the port of Newhaven in East Sussex have always been the most desired of landing zones for the enemies of the Britons. British history of the area dates back to the Bronze age when a large enclosed fort was built on the cliff top. It has remained an important strategic location and continues to be so even today.

The current Newhaven Fort structure was built around the 1860’s and is believed to be the largest work of defence ever constructed in Sussex. It was also considered a vital element in Britain’s coastal defence through both World War 1 and World War 2.  Following its abandonment as a military fortification, Newhaven Fort suffered years of neglect and dereliction; almost in ruins, it has now been restored to provide an award-winning visitor attraction to both the locals of Sussex but also to the many visitors to the area.

Ghostly Happenings

There are numerous reports from visitors to the Fort, when walking into the main tunnels, of being pushed, seeing dark figures slipping into the shadows and multiple orbs have been caught on the security cameras and monitoring systems, other reports include sounds and smells, people have reported the noises of chains clinking. Some believe it is the ghost of a woman called Martha who committed suicide at the fort. Other occurrences happen in the magazines and laboratory.

The forts numerous exhibitions are also a hot bed of activity. People have reported hearing the sounds of footsteps and shuffling, moans of suffering have also been heard and reported on numerous occasions. for more information on visiting newhaven fort can be found here

The Punchbowl Inn. Surrey

Punchbowl Inn, parts of which date back to the 14th century (1300s)

The Punchbowl Inn located in the sleepy village of Oakwood in and is reportedly one of the most haunted in the county of surrey.

The village is also known as Okewood Hill (or Okewoodhill). The name is derives from a local stream called the Oke. The Inn can be dated back to the 14th century (1300s) and is still in use to this day. The Inn hosts the location of the Boxing Day Meet of the Surrey Union Hunt.

The hamlet of Oakwoodhill is also mentioned in the Domesday Book, which was commissioned by William the conqueror after the defeat of King Harold at The Battle Of Hastings, (which actually took place outside Hastings in the now named town of Battle!) in Kent, in the 11th century.

Does an old landlord still call time?

There have been reports of an old bearded gentleman who apparently wanders in all areas of the pub, it has been said that he has a penchant for the bar maids, it is generally believed that he may have been one of the early landlords of the pub, who still believes that he is in charge.

Ghostly Dog

In the public bar side, to the right of the building, there is a fire place, many people have reported encountering a spectral dog, which lays by the fire in the cold weather and has been known to actually growl at people who come too close to him before appearing and then promptly disappearing again!

There have been other reports of Rotating door handles and creaking floorboards accompanied by footsteps being heard in an upstairs room, in addition, the kitchen door, which leads into the bar area, is frequently opened by an invisible entity, this however didn’t  start to happen until the early 1990’s and for no apparent reason, even to this day, this is almost a daily occurrence, usually, late in the afternoon and early evening, this phenomenon has been experienced by many of the patrons many times. In addition, people have observed a ‘grey lady’ in a 17th century crinoline dress walking across the restaurant before disappearing through a wall.

Nearby Grounds

In the field opposite, which is now the cricket ground, one of the local game keepers, William Charman, who, amazingly, was 73 at the time, was fatally thrown from his horse on July 19, 1861 and his ghostly figure can be frequently seen standing by what is now, and believed to have been at that time, the entrance to the field directly opposite to the punchbowl pub. Behind the pub, which is now the car park, there are some old pig stys, these have now been listed and are prohibited from being demolished.

Untimely departing!

During their construction, a worker was mysteriously taken ill, however, he insisted on continuing to work but collapsed, and by the time a doctor was summoned, the poor chap had expired, no apparent reason could be established for his demise, but it is reported that he is occasionally seen sitting on an invisible wall eating his lunch. Perhaps he is trying to give us a clue to his untimely departing.

The History of The Devil

The History of the Devil – From the beginnings of Judaism to the present day war on terror this feature film covers many aspects on how interpretation of the Devil have been formed.

This film also covers how our belief in the Devil has evolved and how the Devil has been used for countless centuries in providing a powerful means of public and political control.

The Devil or Satan as he is Known in the western world is believed in many religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The Devil is seen as being an effective opposite force to god, and to where both the Devil and God are tied in an eons long holy war for human souls to some people the Devil is an abstract aspect of the individual human condition, yet the same could be said for God.

Whilst mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin, In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. As such, the Devil is seen as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment.

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Battle of Hastings. East Sussex

William, Duke of Normandy invaded Britain in 1066. The Saxons confronted the Norman invaders at the battle of Hastings.

William, Duke of Normandy invaded Britain in 1066. The Saxons confronted the Norman invaders at the battle of Hastings.

Harold was defeated and fell in battle, William ordered Battle Abbey to be erected upon the site that Harold died. The High Alter marks the exact spot on which he fell. King Harold’s blood stained ghost wanders on the anniversary of the battle (14 October). Legend also has it that the blood of the battle’s victims sweats from the grass when it rains. A Fountain of Blood has also been witnessed spewing from the altar.

More Information About The Battle Of Hastings

Sedgemoor Battlefield. Somerset

The battle between one ‘rebel army’ led by James, Duke of Monmouth and the other ‘royal army’ led by Lord Faversham

The battle between one ‘rebel army’ led by James, Duke of Monmouth and the other ‘royal army’ led by Lord Faversham, took place on the 6th July 1685.

The ‘Royal army’ prevailed and even ruthlessly slaughtered wounded soldiers on the other side who survived the skirmish. Monmouth was captured 2 days after the clash and executed in London. Ghosts of horsemen have been seen galloping over the battleground. Disembodied voices are heard and the ghostly figure of Monmouth is said to reinact his attempted escape every year.

More Information About Sedgemoor Battlefield