All posts tagged Death

Robin Hoods Grave, Kirklees. Yorkshire

Does Robin Hoods Grave lies at Kirklees Park Estate, West Yorkshire,

Robin Hood is a heroic outlaw in English folklore, and, according to legend, was also a highly skilled archer and swordsman. Does an unmarked grave in Kirklees wood hold the remains of one of Englands greatest heroes… Robin Hood

“The Armytage family lived over the brow of the hill on a splendid site once occupied by Cistercian nuns. It was called Kirklees. There was more than an insularity which set the mansion apart. There was a mystery about it which local people only reluctantly tried to penetrate. The mystery was helped physically by the thick shroud of trees that surrounded the place and was sustained by local tales of ghosts of prioresses and nuns and or the death of Robin Hood whose grave is so imperturbably marked as lying within Kirklees grounds in spite of any facts which might suggest to the contrary.”
THE LAND OF LOST CONTENT.

This would appear to be the first reported mention of ghostly activity around Robin Hood’s Grave, but considering the history of Robin’s death; cursed by a witch on his way to the nunnery, murdered by an apostate nun and cast into an unhallowed grave which is on the crossing of ley lines; it is hardly surprising that the site is reputed to have unquiet spirits hovering around.

Contemporary Ghostly Accounts

An elderly lady, Mrs Edith Ellis, witnessed silver arrows in the sky above Kirklees when visiting her old aunt at Hartshead in the early years of the last century. She also reports hearing Robin calling for Marian. Another sighting was made by a tenant farmer of Kirklees in 1926. One day,” he recalls, “I was sitting on the grave shooting rabbits. As I was about to shoot I felt a tap on my shoulder, and my shotgun went off accidentally, removing two of my front teeth on its recoil. There was nobody to be seen at the time.

On another occasion I was on my way home from the Three Nuns. As I was walking through the woods something fell out of a tree and knocked me to the ground. When I got up I could see the old gatehouse. In the window I could clearly see a man with a bow. My family always said it was the drink, but it was Robin Hood’s ghost.”
In 1963 guitarist Roger Williams took an unofficial stroll up to Robin’s grave with a friend. About twenty yards from the grave he saw a white robed woman who suddenly seemed to glide towards the two men. What made Roger’s hair stand on end was how silently she moved over the twigs and bracken. At about five yards from Roger the woman stopped and stared at him with “dark, mad eyes.” Then she moved away and vanished. It was 2.30 p.m. and a bright,sunny day.

Roger Williams saw the same apparition again in 1972, in full daylight, and again she stopped a few yards from him and his companion. This time Roger remembered a few more details. The woman was wearing a long white dress with a square neck and long sleeves which accords with the habit of a Cistercian nun. Again she looked at him angrily before moving off, but the eerie sequel to this experience was that Roger’s house then experienced a series of strange noises and bangings. After this, Roger swore that “wild horses would not drag me up there again.”

Mark Gibbons, a member of the Yorkshire Robin Hood Society, had a similar experience in 1998. With other members of the group he had gone up to try and find Robin’s grave one moonlit night, but they had got lost in the dark, tangled wilderness of the Kirklees woods Suddenly Mark saw a white figure pointing in a certain direction which turned out to be exactly where the grave was situated. Mark however was too unnerved to continue and fled back to the roadside while his companions continued their quest.

Famous Investigators

A later explorer to Kirklees, vampire hunter Bishop Sean Manchester, had a similar experience when he was confronted with a “wild staring hag with red eyes” and his fellow vampire hunters deserted him, one of them becoming impaled on a bramble bush.

It is true that Robin’s grave was excavated in an amateurish way by a Victorian Armytage (who was reputed to be in his cups at the time) and the ground beneath found to be undisturbed, but the many historical documents naming Kirklees as Robin’s final resting place cannot be ignored.

The fact is, his bones could lie anywhere on that hillside, while a gravestone resembling the original one drawn by Dr Johnstone, is to be found in nearby Hartshead churchyard, to where it may have been moved during the Civil War. Many visitors to the grave have recorded their experiences for posterity, including the following quote from a Victorian tourist :

“I had the strangest emotions when I first stood over the grave of this old forest hero. I stood there and had no words, nor can I find any now to tell what my feelings were. Bravehearted Robin ! Thou hast found a fit resting place in this glorious park, among these solemn yews and silent trees .”

A hundred years later it is a different story:

“There it was, looming out of the dark, a massive,broken edifice, a huge ship of stone, wrecked in the everglades of Kirklees. Fallen pillars and twisted railings were were all that remained on Yorkshire’s buried treasure. We had found Robin Hood’s Grave.” – MARK GIBBONS, SECRETS OF THE GRAVE.

Feature Length Interview : Robin Hood’s Grave Revisited with David Farrent

Maybe the last word should be with Victorian poet, George Searle Phillips, a friend of the Brontes, who visited the grave in 1848, and wrote an epic poem, a small section of which is printed below :

Tread lightly o’er the earth and speak no word
Till the Great Spirit doth unloose your tongues
For where those yew trees nod their funereal plumes
Upon the highest platform of the hill,
Lies gentle Robin Hood, his mighty heart
All muffled up in dust and his bright eyes
Quenched in eternal darkness. Never more
Shall the woods echo to his bugle horn,
Or his unerring arrow strike the deer
Swift flying, till it hits the bloody grass.

Haunted Island would like to thank the Author of this story Barbara Green for her valuable contribution.

The Devils Bible – Codex Gigas

The Devils Bible – Codex Gigas is a mysterious book that in its day was believed to contain all human knowledge and ancient arcane spells.

According to legend in the Middle Ages, a monk who broke his monastic vows and was sentenced to be walled up alive as punishment. In an desperate appeal for clemency he promised to create in one single night a book to glorify the monastery forever. However, as midnight approached the enormity of the task became to much and sure that he could not complete this task alone, he made a special pact, not with God but to the fallen angel Lucifer, asking him to help him finish the book in exchange for his soul.

The devil completed the manuscript and the monk added the devil’s picture out of gratitude for his aid.

The Devils Bible Documentary

The documentary explores the The “Devil’s Bible, from its creation and tries to answer the questions relating to this mysterious and aged codex.
The codex is bound in a wooden folder covered with leather and ornate metal cornering. At 92 cm (36.2in.) tall, 50 cm (19.7in.) wide and 22 cm (8.6in.) thick it is the largest known medieval manuscript.

Weighing 74.8 kg (165 pounds),  the same weight as an average human, the Codex Gigas is composed of 310 leaves of vellum allegedly made from the skins of 160 donkeys .

The Codex Gigas is the world’s largest medieval manuscript.  It initially contained 320 sheets, though some of these were subsequently removed.  It is unknown who removed the pages or for what purpose but it seems likely that they contained the monastic rules of the Benedictine’s.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Further Information on the Codex Gigas

The History of The Devil

The History of the Devil – From the beginnings of Judaism to the present day war on terror this feature film covers many aspects on how interpretation of the Devil have been formed.

This film also covers how our belief in the Devil has evolved and how the Devil has been used for countless centuries in providing a powerful means of public and political control.

The Devil or Satan as he is Known in the western world is believed in many religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The Devil is seen as being an effective opposite force to god, and to where both the Devil and God are tied in an eons long holy war for human souls to some people the Devil is an abstract aspect of the individual human condition, yet the same could be said for God.

Whilst mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin, In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. As such, the Devil is seen as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment.

FAIR USE NOTICE: The material on this post is provided solely for educational and informational purposes. It may contain copyrighted material, the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Infringement of copyright is not intended. The material is made available to help educate people. It is believed that this constitutes a ‘FAIR USE’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17, section 107 of the US Copyright Law. The material is distributed without profit to those who would like to use such material for research and educational purposes.

FAIR USE NOTICE The use of the media material found on this post is protected by the Fair Use Clause of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, which allows for the rebroadcast of copyrighted materials for the purposes of commentary, criticism, and education.

Oakley Court. Berkshire

The Court was built in 1859 in the style of a French Chateau

A number of ghostly hooded figures have been seen walking the grounds of Oakley Court

Remarkably little is known about the property despite the fact that it was built over 120 years ago. Oakley Court is situated along a stretch of the river Thames known as Water Oakley. It was first shown on maps around 1800 and the name appears to originate from Cornish Breton in which it appears as “Warhta Eog Lee” — The Upper Salmon Place.

The Court was originally built in 1859 for Sir Richard Hall Say and legend has it that he built it in the style of a French Chateau to comfort his homesick young French wife.

The court has a very  reputation for being ‘evil’, and a number of accidental drownings both in the building and outside of it have occurred over the past thirty years. One such tragic story involves that of a woman named Penelope Gallerneault.

Mrs Penelope Gallerneault, 26, lived in a flat in the Victorian-Gothic country house of Oakley Court,.The family were warned by friends before they moved in that the place was spooky and had previous history of accidents involving death by drowning. In the three years they were there, she and her husband and children suffered many tragedies.

The horror began in the summer of 1972. ‘I started to see people walking in the grounds wearing hoods,’ she says.  In December her two-year-old son, William, died. Mrs Gallerneault was running him a bath when the phone went.

When she returned he was floating in the water. ‘I realize that many people might try to blame me for being careless, but that is just not the case.’ A second tragedy struck the family when her second son Edward, who was just two, was left in his playpen in the grounds. Somehow he got out, toddled down to the river, fell in and drowned.

Mrs Gallerneault said, ‘The house has an aura of evil and I could never go back there.  The Rev. Sebastian Jones, curate of St Michael’s Church, Bray, added: ‘Oakley Court is definitely “spooky” and I would not want to stay there myself. Evil can generate evil, and the grounds would be an ideal place to practise black magic’ The police, called in at every stage, are mystified too.

A senior policeman said: ‘There have been some strange happenings at the house, which have never been explained. We made regular patrols after complaints about witches, and things seem to have quietened down now.

In the 1950s, the place was left derelict for many years. The atmosphere around the building apparently became so oppressive that it caused a number of people to commit suicide in the Thames.